General Molding & Trim Information (2)

T–Molding Wood / Wood Floor Transitions

T-Moldings are appropriately named as the profile resembles a capital T. The T-Molding is used in situations where you’re transitioning from one hard surface to a second hard surface. The top part of the T-Molding overlaps both hard surfaces. It’s incredibly important that these two hard surfaces are the same height, as, if one side doesn’t have the appropriate support, that side of the molding will start to crack once it’s being stepped on. The same reasoning goes for why the T-Molding can not be used to transition to carpet, there’s just not enough support.

If hardwood flooring is being floated across a few rooms, it’s always recommended to use T-Moldings in doorways. In larger areas, an expansion joint is also recommended if floating hardwood flooring layout is going to exceed 30 feet in any particular room.

To install a T-Molding, a space needs to be left between the two hard surfaces. The transition piece is then glued down where it meets the subfloor using construction adhesive. It’s recommended to place a heavy object on the newly glued T-Molding overnight, in order to ensure a tight bond. In addition to being glued down, you can also choose to face nail the T-Molding (in the middle of the T-Molding) to the subfloor using 8 penny finish nails. It might be helpful to drill a pilot hole slightly smaller that the nail.

Consult the manufacturer’s installation instructions for the best results.

T–Molding Wood / Laminate Floor Transitions

The T-Molding top overlaps both hard surfaces, in this case, a wood floor and a laminate floor. The top of the mold will conceal the gap required to let a the two floors expand. It must be stress the two hard surfaces should be the same height. This T-molding uses an anchor channel to transfer traffic weight loads. This may offer some considerations between uneven floors, but care should be taken because if one side doesn’t have the appropriate support because that the ridge of the T-molding may start to crack once it’s being stepped on.

If hardwood flooring is being floated across a few rooms, it’s always recommended to use T-Moldings in doorways. In larger areas, an expansion joint is also recommended if floating hardwood flooring layout is going to exceed 30 feet in any particular room.

To install a T-Molding, a space needs to be left between the two hard surfaces. This transition design relies on a metal track that is nailed or screwed to the floor between the two hard surfaces. The T-molding is then snapped into place. This method is glueless and makes installing a floating floor quicker since there is no glue drying time.

Consult the manufacturer’s installation instructions for the best results.

T–Molding Laminate / Laminate Transitions

The top part of the T-Molding overlaps both hard surfaces, in this case, a laminate floor and a laminate floor. The top of the mold will conceal the gap required to let a the two floors expand. It must be stressed the two hard surfaces should be the same height. This T-molding uses an anchor channel to transfer traffic weight loads and hold the trim in place.

If hardwood flooring is being floated across a few rooms, it’s always recommended to use T-Moldings in doorways. In larger areas, an expansion joint is also recommended if the floating flooring layout is going to exceed 30 feet in any particular room.

To install a T-Molding, a space needs to be left between the two hard surfaces. This transition design relies on a metal track that is nailed or screwed to the floor between the two hard surfaces. The T-molding is then snapped into place. This method is glue-less and makes installing a floating floor quicker since there is no glue drying time.

Consult the manufacturer’s installation instructions for the best results.

Flush Reducer Molding Wood Floor Transitions

When you’re installing a hardwood floor using a nail, staple or glue-down installation, a Flush Reducer can be used to smoothly transition the new hardwood floor down to a second flooring type, such as vinyl, ceramic tile or low pile carpet.

Flush Reducers can be glued to the subfloor with construction adhesive and/or face nailed using 8 penny finish nails. A Flush Reducer should only be used with flooring that is secured to the subfloor (nailed, stapled or glued down) and not with a hardwood floor or laminate floor that is being floated. This is because a floating floor needs room to move and a Flush Reducer would not allow for the necessary expansion gap.

Consult the manufacturer’s installation instructions for the best results.

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